Projects: Recognising the Need and Justifying the Investment

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Just because someone has an idea for a project, doesn’t mean it should go ahead.

An organisation’s process for deciding which projects get dropped or deferred (often a euphemism for “dropped”) and which ones get approved is sometimes intuitive, informal, ineffective and inconsistent; the equivalent of rolling dice or the random throwing of darts. Each project has different costs, benefits and risks, and rarely are these known in advance with much certainty.

Rational project selection is an important process, but it’s not easy and many organisations struggle with issues such as running too many projects at once, misaligned business goals and projects, poor co-ordination between projects, lack of management commitment, deficient cross-functional collaboration, resistance to change, reluctance to terminate poorly performing projects, no attempt to check if project benefits have been realised, and finding the right balance between smaller short-term projects that … Read More »


Dealing with Difficult Participants

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One challenging thing to deal with as a facilitator is the “difficult” participant.

Sometimes tricky behaviours will emerge during a training session and often when participants don’t feel safe, valued or heard. Much of this behaviour is amusing and tolerable providing it doesn’t impinge on other’s learning. We’ve got the prisoner, the latecomer, the sleeper (although, sleeping I don’t mind; it’s the snoring that might annoy), the know-it-all, the side conversations, the bored, the confused, the domineering, the challenger, and the otherwise preoccupied – the text messenger. In some thirty years of training I’ve met them all.

It is not uncommon to find at least one participant in a workshop who is not fully or positively engaged. When confronted with such behaviour, we might step back and objectively assess what might be the root cause of their behaviour. For example, why would someone … Read More »


Closing a Project

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In a rush to get projects done, one of the most often overlooked, but critical, tasks of a project manager (PM) is conducting the project close-out step. The project close-out, closing, closure, termination or finish phase is the fourth and last phase in the project life cycle. In this phase, we formally close our project, and evaluate and report its overall performance.

Once the project product(s) has been produced and accepted by our sponsor and customer, our PM responsibilities continue to ensure that the project is properly closed down. A stakeholder acceptance meeting, as the name implies, is when our project team meets with other key stakeholders to review the project product and ensure that it is acceptable.

But sometimes projects take on a never-ending characteristic. They go into limbo land and are never allowed to close often because … Read More »


Project Risk Myths Debunked

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If we were to look up the definition of the word myth, we would find that one definition is that a myth is a “widely held, but false belief or idea.” In many respects a myth is much the same as a false assumption – “factors that, for planning purposes, are considered to be true, real, or certain without proof or demonstration.”  In other words, if we know that a belief is false, then it is not an assumption.  Also, if we know something to be verifiable then it is not an assumption but a fact. Importantly, all assumptions are risks and should therefore be recorded and subject to risk analysis. 

Myth 1: All risk is bad. Risks are potential problems, and if they happen then we are in trouble. The Truth. Risk includes both threats and opportunities, … Read More »


Project Management Programme

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During the three days 3–5 May 2017 I delivered a project management training programme for Ruapehu Whanau Transformation at their excellent training premises at Ohakune in full view of the impressive Mount Ruapehu. The intensive training was well-received and the participants impressed me with their keen interest and conscientious application – particularly their ability to work effectively as a team, which was most evident during the final exercise when they co-operated to produce and present an outstanding solution.

Attached is some PRE-COURSE READING and the comprehensive WORKBOOK that contains the exercises that we used to good effect during the programme, and also attached are the POWERPOINT slides that supported the tuition. Click on the red words for access to these items, but do check … Read More »



Blog

My latest thoughts on Project Management and life.

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Monte Carlo Simulation

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Time Management

Among other changes, the Project Management Institute in their latest Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Edition 6) has sensibly renamed the “Time Management”...